As the north of Britain battens down the hatches for what's sure to be known as the Great WeatherBomb of 2014, we've been raiding the archives for legendary weather events of days gone by.

Dorset's found itself buried under snow a few times over the years. The great blizzards of 1881 and 1891 saw 36 inches reportedly fall at Ringwood and people had to climb out of first floor windows because the snow had covered their front doors.

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Barrack Rd, looking towards the town from around Stour Rd following a great snowstorm, apparently in
March 1891. Red House Museum, Hampshire Cultural Trust.

Then in 1908, a combination of low pressure and artic air across the south of England saw more than a foot of snow fall between April 23-25 1908. These days we'd call it a #snowbomb. Back then, we said: "

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Swanage and Wareham Voice: The great snow storm of 1908 in Bournemouth Squae

Bournemouth Square on April 25th during the great snow storm of 1908. Picture from Andrew Hakes, Poole picture archive

 

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Tobogganing on Poole's Constitution Hill in 1908. Picture from Andrew Hakes, Poole picture archive

 

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A train coming into Poole Station in 1908. Picture from Andrew Hawkes, Poole picture archive

Swanage and Wareham Voice: The Winter Gardens entrance during the Great Snow storm of 1908. Picture from the Peters Collection

The Winter Gardens entrance during the great snow storm of 1908. Picture from the Peters Collection. 

 

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Undercliff Drive in Bournemouth in 1908. Picture from Andrew Hawkes, Poole picture archive

 

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A giant snowman in 1908. Picture from Andrew Hawkes, Poole photo archive

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Ice at Sandbanks, Andrew Hawkes Poole photo archive

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Bournemouth Pier in snow, 1908. Picture Andrew Hawkes Poole Photo Archive

Swanage and Wareham Voice: Poole Quay in snow 1908Poole Quay in snow 1908

Picture Andrew Hawkes Poole Photo Archive

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Snow falls in Poole High Street in April 1908. Picture Andrew Hawkes Poole Photo Archive

Swanage and Wareham Voice: Picture Andrew Hawkes Poole Photo ArchivePicture Andrew Hawkes Poole Photo Archive

Skaters on Poole Park's frozen lake. Picture Andrew Hawkes Poole Photo Archive

Swanage and Wareham Voice: Picture Andrew Hawkes Poole Photo Archive Picture Andrew Hawkes Poole Photo Archive

Picture Andrew Hawkes Poole Photo Archive

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Picture Andrew Hawkes Poole Photo Archive

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Picture Andrew Hawkes Poole Photo Archive

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Sandbanks Road, 1908. Picture Andrew Hawkes Poole Photo Archive

The next big freeze was in 1962-63. A post-Christmas blizzard - the "worst weather havoc for many years", left snowdrifts as deep as 10ft.

The Echo reported Weymouth was cut off, roads were impassable and buses abandoned as the blizzard swept in. The River Stour froze over and stayed that way until March 1963.

January 1963 was the coldest month of the 20th century. The Echo reported on January 1 that more than 50 corporation workmen had failed to report for duty because of exhaustion, while milk deliveries were ‘chaotic’.

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A bus stranded in a snow drift

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Workmen clear Bournemouth sea front of snow

Swanage and Wareham Voice: Barrack Rd, looking towards the town from around Stour Rd following a great snowstorm, apparently in The Quay, showing a frozen river Stour and a snowy Quomps. Probably taken in the severe winter of 1963. MUST CREDIT copyright Red House Museum, Hampshire Cultural Trust.Barrack Rd, looking towards the town from around Stour Rd following a great snowstorm, apparently in The Quay, showing a frozen river Stour and a snowy Quomps. Probably taken in the severe winter of 1963. MUST CREDIT copyright Red House Museum, Hampshire Cultural Trust.

Christchurch Quay, showing a frozen river Stour and a snowy Quomps. Red House Museum, Hampshire Cultural Trust.

Swanage and Wareham Voice: n Geoffrey and Richard Adams walk on the frozen River Stour at Christchurch during the cold spell of 1963 – the river was frozen over from Boxing Day 1962 and didn’t thaw until early March 1963

The frozen River Stour

Then in 1978, Dorset was brought to a standstill be the worst snowfall in living memory. A foot fell in a morning, leading the Echo to report the county was closed to traffic outside of the cities. Hundreds of sheep died, thousands of litres of milk had to be poured away and the cost of clearing the county's roads was estimated at £500,000 (more than £2.7m in today's money.)

More than 150 teenagers spent the night at Bournemouth Town Hall after the snow left them stranded after a dance. Five days after the storm, on February 18, Echo reporter Jeremy Gunn sent this report from the village where he was still snowed in:

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Bournemouth Pier, 1978

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Submitted print from John Booth of snow in Winston Avenue, Poole 1978.

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Poole High Street

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Do you have pictures of snowy Christmas Past? We'd love to see them! Email digital@bournemouthecho.co.uk